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Doyle Family History

Doyle (or O’Doyle) is one of the most frequently occurring surnames in counties Wexford, Wicklow, Carlow and Dublin and is derived from the Irish Ó Dubhghaill, meaning ‘a descendant of the dark (dubh) stranger (gall)’.

The name is not included in the great Gaelic genealogies but it appears as Dubhghall in the Annals of the Four Masters where it is often used to distinguish the darker-haired Danish Vikings from the fair haired Norwegian ones (Fionnghall - fair stranger) in the period AD 978 to 1013.

The Doyles’ main area of settlement was along the Leinster seaboard particularly in counties Wexford and Wi
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    ๐Ÿ˜€๐Ÿ˜ฌ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‚๐Ÿ˜ƒ๐Ÿ˜„๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ˜†๐Ÿ˜‡๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜Š๐Ÿ™‚๐Ÿ™ƒโ˜บ๐Ÿ˜‹๐Ÿ˜Œ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜˜๐Ÿ˜—๐Ÿ˜™๐Ÿ˜š๐Ÿ˜œ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜›๐Ÿค‘๐Ÿค“๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿค—๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜ถ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‘๐Ÿ˜’๐Ÿ™„๐Ÿค”๐Ÿ˜ณ๐Ÿ˜ž๐Ÿ˜Ÿ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜ก๐Ÿ˜”๐Ÿ˜•๐Ÿ™โ˜น๐Ÿ˜ฃ๐Ÿ˜–๐Ÿ˜ซ๐Ÿ˜ฉ๐Ÿ˜ค๐Ÿ˜ฎ๐Ÿ˜ฑ๐Ÿ˜จ๐Ÿ˜ฐ๐Ÿ˜ฏ๐Ÿ˜ฆ๐Ÿ˜ง๐Ÿ˜ข๐Ÿ˜ฅ๐Ÿ˜ช๐Ÿ˜“๐Ÿ˜ญ๐Ÿ˜ต๐Ÿ˜ฒ๐Ÿค๐Ÿ˜ท๐Ÿค’๐Ÿค•๐Ÿ˜ด๐Ÿ’ค๐Ÿ’ฉ๐Ÿ˜ˆ๐Ÿ‘ฟ๐Ÿ‘น๐Ÿ‘บ๐Ÿ’€๐Ÿ‘ป๐Ÿ‘ฝ๐Ÿค–๐Ÿ˜บ๐Ÿ˜ธ๐Ÿ˜น๐Ÿ˜ป๐Ÿ˜ผ๐Ÿ˜ฝ๐Ÿ™€๐Ÿ˜ฟ๐Ÿ˜พ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘‹๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘Ž๐Ÿ‘ŠโœŠโœŒ๐Ÿ‘Œโœ‹๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿ™โ˜๐Ÿ‘†๐Ÿ‘‡๐Ÿ‘ˆ๐Ÿ‘‰๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–๐Ÿค˜๐Ÿ––โœ๐Ÿ’…๐Ÿ‘„๐Ÿ‘…๐Ÿ‘‚๐Ÿ‘ƒ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘€๐Ÿ‘ค๐Ÿ‘ฅ๐Ÿ—ฃ๐Ÿ‘ถ๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ง๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ฉ๐Ÿ‘ฑ๐Ÿ‘ด๐Ÿ‘ต๐Ÿ‘ฒ๐Ÿ‘ณ๐Ÿ‘ฎ๐Ÿ‘ท๐Ÿ’‚๐Ÿ•ต๐ŸŽ…๐Ÿ‘ผ๐Ÿ‘ธ๐Ÿ‘ฐ๐Ÿšถ๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ’ƒ๐Ÿ‘ฏ๐Ÿ‘ซ๐Ÿ‘ฌ๐Ÿ‘ญ๐Ÿ™‡๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ™…๐Ÿ™†๐Ÿ™‹๐Ÿ™Ž๐Ÿ™๐Ÿ’‡๐Ÿ’†๐Ÿ’‘๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€โค๏ธโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉ๐Ÿ‘จโ€โค๏ธโ€๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€โค๏ธโ€๐Ÿ’‹โ€๐Ÿ‘ฉ๐Ÿ‘จโ€โค๏ธโ€๐Ÿ’‹โ€๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿ‘ช๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ง๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘งโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘งโ€๐Ÿ‘ง๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ง๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘งโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘ฉโ€๐Ÿ‘งโ€๐Ÿ‘ง๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘ง๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘งโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆโ€๐Ÿ‘ฆ๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘จโ€๐Ÿ‘งโ€๐Ÿ‘ง๐Ÿ‘š๐Ÿ‘•๐Ÿ‘–๐Ÿ‘”๐Ÿ‘—๐Ÿ‘™๐Ÿ‘˜๐Ÿ’„๐Ÿ’‹๐Ÿ‘ฃ๐Ÿ‘ ๐Ÿ‘ก๐Ÿ‘ข๐Ÿ‘ž๐Ÿ‘Ÿ๐Ÿ‘’๐ŸŽฉ๐ŸŽ“๐Ÿ‘‘โ›‘๐ŸŽ’๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘›๐Ÿ‘œ๐Ÿ’ผ๐Ÿ‘“๐Ÿ•ถ๐Ÿ’๐ŸŒ‚
    ๐Ÿถ๐Ÿฑ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿน๐Ÿฐ๐Ÿป๐Ÿผ๐Ÿจ๐Ÿฏ๐Ÿฆ๐Ÿฎ๐Ÿท๐Ÿฝ๐Ÿธ๐Ÿ™๐Ÿต๐Ÿ™ˆ๐Ÿ™‰๐Ÿ™Š๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ”๐Ÿง๐Ÿฆ๐Ÿค๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿฅ๐Ÿบ๐Ÿ—๐Ÿด๐Ÿฆ„๐Ÿ๐Ÿ›๐ŸŒ๐Ÿž๐Ÿœ๐Ÿ•ท๐Ÿฆ‚๐Ÿฆ€๐Ÿ๐Ÿข๐Ÿ ๐ŸŸ๐Ÿก๐Ÿฌ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿ‹๐ŸŠ๐Ÿ†๐Ÿ…๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ‚๐Ÿ„๐Ÿช๐Ÿซ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ‘๐ŸŽ๐Ÿ–๐Ÿ€๐Ÿ๐Ÿ“๐Ÿฆƒ๐Ÿ•Š๐Ÿ•๐Ÿฉ๐Ÿˆ๐Ÿ‡๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ‰๐Ÿฒ๐ŸŒต๐ŸŽ„๐ŸŒฒ๐ŸŒณ๐ŸŒด๐ŸŒฑ๐ŸŒฟโ˜˜๐Ÿ€๐ŸŽ๐ŸŽ‹๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ‚๐Ÿ๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒบ๐ŸŒป๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒท๐ŸŒผ๐ŸŒธ๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ„๐ŸŒฐ๐ŸŽƒ๐Ÿš๐Ÿ•ธ๐ŸŒŽ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ•๐ŸŒ–๐ŸŒ—๐ŸŒ˜๐ŸŒ‘๐ŸŒ’๐ŸŒ“๐ŸŒ”๐ŸŒš๐ŸŒ๐ŸŒ›๐ŸŒœ๐ŸŒž๐ŸŒ™โญ๐ŸŒŸ๐Ÿ’ซโœจโ˜„โ˜€๐ŸŒคโ›…๐ŸŒฅ๐ŸŒฆโ˜๐ŸŒงโ›ˆ๐ŸŒฉโšก๐Ÿ”ฅ๐Ÿ’ฅโ„๐ŸŒจโ˜ƒโ›„๐ŸŒฌ๐Ÿ’จ๐ŸŒช๐ŸŒซโ˜‚โ˜”๐Ÿ’ง๐Ÿ’ฆ๐ŸŒŠ
    ๐Ÿ๐ŸŽ๐Ÿ๐ŸŠ๐Ÿ‹๐ŸŒ๐Ÿ‰๐Ÿ‡๐Ÿ“๐Ÿˆ๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ๐Ÿ…๐Ÿ†๐ŸŒถ๐ŸŒฝ๐Ÿ ๐Ÿฏ๐Ÿž๐Ÿง€๐Ÿ—๐Ÿ–๐Ÿค๐Ÿณ๐Ÿ”๐ŸŸ๐ŸŒญ๐Ÿ•๐Ÿ๐ŸŒฎ๐ŸŒฏ๐Ÿœ๐Ÿฒ๐Ÿฅ๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿฑ๐Ÿ›๐Ÿ™๐Ÿš๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿข๐Ÿก๐Ÿง๐Ÿจ๐Ÿฆ๐Ÿฐ๐ŸŽ‚๐Ÿฎ๐Ÿฌ๐Ÿญ๐Ÿซ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿฉ๐Ÿช๐Ÿบ๐Ÿป๐Ÿท๐Ÿธ๐Ÿน๐Ÿพ๐Ÿถ๐Ÿตโ˜•๐Ÿผ๐Ÿด๐Ÿฝ
    โšฝ๐Ÿ€๐Ÿˆโšพ๐ŸŽพ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ‰๐ŸŽฑโ›ณ๐ŸŒ๐Ÿ“๐Ÿธ๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ๐ŸŽฟโ›ท๐Ÿ‚โ›ธ๐Ÿน๐ŸŽฃ๐Ÿšฃ๐ŸŠ๐Ÿ„๐Ÿ›€โ›น๐Ÿ‹๐Ÿšด๐Ÿšต๐Ÿ‡๐Ÿ•ด๐Ÿ†๐ŸŽฝ๐Ÿ…๐ŸŽ–๐ŸŽ—๐Ÿต๐ŸŽซ๐ŸŽŸ๐ŸŽญ๐ŸŽจ๐ŸŽช๐ŸŽค๐ŸŽง๐ŸŽผ๐ŸŽน๐ŸŽท๐ŸŽบ๐ŸŽธ๐ŸŽป๐ŸŽฌ๐ŸŽฎ๐Ÿ‘พ๐ŸŽฏ๐ŸŽฒ๐ŸŽฐ๐ŸŽณ
    ๐Ÿš—๐Ÿš•๐Ÿš™๐ŸšŒ๐ŸšŽ๐ŸŽ๐Ÿš“๐Ÿš‘๐Ÿš’๐Ÿš๐Ÿšš๐Ÿš›๐Ÿšœ๐Ÿ๐Ÿšฒ๐Ÿšจ๐Ÿš”๐Ÿš๐Ÿš˜๐Ÿš–๐Ÿšก๐Ÿš ๐ŸšŸ๐Ÿšƒ๐Ÿš‹๐Ÿš๐Ÿš„๐Ÿš…๐Ÿšˆ๐Ÿšž๐Ÿš‚๐Ÿš†๐Ÿš‡๐ŸšŠ๐Ÿš‰๐Ÿš๐Ÿ›ฉโœˆ๐Ÿ›ซ๐Ÿ›ฌโ›ต๐Ÿ›ฅ๐Ÿšคโ›ด๐Ÿ›ณ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿ›ฐ๐Ÿ’บโš“๐Ÿšงโ›ฝ๐Ÿš๐Ÿšฆ๐Ÿšฅ๐Ÿ๐Ÿšข๐ŸŽก๐ŸŽข๐ŸŽ ๐Ÿ—๐ŸŒ๐Ÿ—ผ๐Ÿญโ›ฒ๐ŸŽ‘โ›ฐ๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ—ป๐ŸŒ‹๐Ÿ—พ๐Ÿ•โ›บ๐Ÿž๐Ÿ›ฃ๐Ÿ›ค๐ŸŒ…๐ŸŒ„๐Ÿœ๐Ÿ–๐Ÿ๐ŸŒ‡๐ŸŒ†๐Ÿ™๐ŸŒƒ๐ŸŒ‰๐ŸŒŒ๐ŸŒ ๐ŸŽ‡๐ŸŽ†๐ŸŒˆ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿฐ๐Ÿฏ๐ŸŸ๐Ÿ—ฝ๐Ÿ ๐Ÿก๐Ÿš๐Ÿข๐Ÿฌ๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿค๐Ÿฅ๐Ÿฆ๐Ÿจ๐Ÿช๐Ÿซ๐Ÿฉ๐Ÿ’’๐Ÿ›โ›ช๐Ÿ•Œ๐Ÿ•๐Ÿ•‹โ›ฉ
    โŒš๐Ÿ“ฑ๐Ÿ“ฒ๐Ÿ’ปโŒจ๐Ÿ–ฅ๐Ÿ–จ๐Ÿ–ฑ๐Ÿ–ฒ๐Ÿ•น๐Ÿ—œ๐Ÿ’ฝ๐Ÿ’พ๐Ÿ’ฟ๐Ÿ“€๐Ÿ“ผ๐Ÿ“ท๐Ÿ“ธ๐Ÿ“น๐ŸŽฅ๐Ÿ“ฝ๐ŸŽž๐Ÿ“žโ˜Ž๐Ÿ“Ÿ๐Ÿ“ ๐Ÿ“บ๐Ÿ“ป๐ŸŽ™๐ŸŽš๐ŸŽ›โฑโฒโฐ๐Ÿ•ฐโณโŒ›๐Ÿ“ก๐Ÿ”‹๐Ÿ”Œ๐Ÿ’ก๐Ÿ”ฆ๐Ÿ•ฏ๐Ÿ—‘๐Ÿ›ข๐Ÿ’ธ๐Ÿ’ต๐Ÿ’ด๐Ÿ’ถ๐Ÿ’ท๐Ÿ’ฐ๐Ÿ’ณ๐Ÿ’Žโš–๐Ÿ”ง๐Ÿ”จโš’๐Ÿ› โ›๐Ÿ”ฉโš™โ›“๐Ÿ”ซ๐Ÿ’ฃ๐Ÿ”ช๐Ÿ—กโš”๐Ÿ›ก๐Ÿšฌโ˜ โšฐโšฑ๐Ÿบ๐Ÿ”ฎ๐Ÿ“ฟ๐Ÿ’ˆโš—๐Ÿ”ญ๐Ÿ”ฌ๐Ÿ•ณ๐Ÿ’Š๐Ÿ’‰๐ŸŒก๐Ÿท๐Ÿ”–๐Ÿšฝ๐Ÿšฟ๐Ÿ›๐Ÿ”‘๐Ÿ—๐Ÿ›‹๐Ÿ›Œ๐Ÿ›๐Ÿšช๐Ÿ›Ž๐Ÿ–ผ๐Ÿ—บโ›ฑ๐Ÿ—ฟ๐Ÿ›๐ŸŽˆ๐ŸŽ๐ŸŽ€๐ŸŽ๐ŸŽŠ๐ŸŽ‰๐ŸŽŽ๐ŸŽ๐ŸŽŒ๐Ÿฎโœ‰๐Ÿ“ฉ๐Ÿ“จ๐Ÿ“ง๐Ÿ’Œ๐Ÿ“ฎ๐Ÿ“ช๐Ÿ“ซ๐Ÿ“ฌ๐Ÿ“ญ๐Ÿ“ฆ๐Ÿ“ฏ๐Ÿ“ฅ๐Ÿ“ค๐Ÿ“œ๐Ÿ“ƒ๐Ÿ“‘๐Ÿ“Š๐Ÿ“ˆ๐Ÿ“‰๐Ÿ“„๐Ÿ“…๐Ÿ“†๐Ÿ—“๐Ÿ“‡๐Ÿ—ƒ๐Ÿ—ณ๐Ÿ—„๐Ÿ“‹๐Ÿ—’๐Ÿ“๐Ÿ“‚๐Ÿ—‚๐Ÿ—ž๐Ÿ“ฐ๐Ÿ““๐Ÿ“•๐Ÿ“—๐Ÿ“˜๐Ÿ“™๐Ÿ“”๐Ÿ“’๐Ÿ“š๐Ÿ“–๐Ÿ”—๐Ÿ“Ž๐Ÿ–‡โœ‚๐Ÿ“๐Ÿ“๐Ÿ“Œ๐Ÿ“๐Ÿšฉ๐Ÿณ๐Ÿด๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ”’๐Ÿ”“๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ–Š๐Ÿ–‹โœ’๐Ÿ“โœ๐Ÿ–๐Ÿ–Œ๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ”Ž
    โค๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’œ๐Ÿ’”โฃ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’ž๐Ÿ’“๐Ÿ’—๐Ÿ’–๐Ÿ’˜๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ’Ÿโ˜ฎโœโ˜ช๐Ÿ•‰โ˜ธโœก๐Ÿ”ฏ๐Ÿ•Žโ˜ฏโ˜ฆ๐Ÿ›โ›Žโ™ˆโ™‰โ™Šโ™‹โ™Œโ™โ™Žโ™โ™โ™‘โ™’โ™“๐Ÿ†”โš›๐Ÿˆณ๐Ÿˆนโ˜ขโ˜ฃ๐Ÿ“ด๐Ÿ“ณ๐Ÿˆถ๐Ÿˆš๐Ÿˆธ๐Ÿˆบ๐Ÿˆทโœด๐Ÿ†š๐Ÿ‰‘๐Ÿ’ฎ๐Ÿ‰ใŠ™ใŠ—๐Ÿˆด๐Ÿˆต๐Ÿˆฒ๐Ÿ…ฐ๐Ÿ…ฑ๐Ÿ†Ž๐Ÿ†‘๐Ÿ…พ๐Ÿ†˜โ›”๐Ÿ“›๐ŸšซโŒโญ•๐Ÿ’ขโ™จ๐Ÿšท๐Ÿšฏ๐Ÿšณ๐Ÿšฑ๐Ÿ”ž๐Ÿ“ตโ—โ•โ“โ”โ€ผโ‰๐Ÿ’ฏ๐Ÿ”…๐Ÿ”†๐Ÿ”ฑโšœใ€ฝโš ๐Ÿšธ๐Ÿ”ฐโ™ป๐Ÿˆฏ๐Ÿ’นโ‡โœณโŽโœ…๐Ÿ’ ๐ŸŒ€โžฟ๐ŸŒโ“‚๐Ÿง๐Ÿˆ‚๐Ÿ›‚๐Ÿ›ƒ๐Ÿ›„๐Ÿ›…โ™ฟ๐Ÿšญ๐Ÿšพ๐Ÿ…ฟ๐Ÿšฐ๐Ÿšน๐Ÿšบ๐Ÿšผ๐Ÿšป๐Ÿšฎ๐ŸŽฆ๐Ÿ“ถ๐Ÿˆ๐Ÿ†–๐Ÿ†—๐Ÿ†™๐Ÿ†’๐Ÿ†•๐Ÿ†“0โƒฃ1โƒฃ2โƒฃ3โƒฃ4โƒฃ5โƒฃ6โƒฃ7โƒฃ8โƒฃ9โƒฃ๐Ÿ”Ÿ๐Ÿ”ขโ–ถโธโฏโนโบโญโฎโฉโช๐Ÿ”€๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ”‚โ—€๐Ÿ”ผ๐Ÿ”ฝโซโฌโžกโฌ…โฌ†โฌ‡โ†—โ†˜โ†™โ†–โ†•โ†”๐Ÿ”„โ†ชโ†ฉโคดโคต#โƒฃ*โƒฃโ„น๐Ÿ”ค๐Ÿ”ก๐Ÿ” ๐Ÿ”ฃ๐ŸŽต๐ŸŽถใ€ฐโžฐโœ”๐Ÿ”ƒโž•โž–โž—โœ–๐Ÿ’ฒ๐Ÿ’ฑ๐Ÿ”š๐Ÿ”™๐Ÿ”›๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ”œโ˜‘๐Ÿ”˜โšชโšซ๐Ÿ”ด๐Ÿ”ต๐Ÿ”ธ๐Ÿ”น๐Ÿ”ถ๐Ÿ”ท๐Ÿ”บโ–ชโ–ซโฌ›โฌœ๐Ÿ”ปโ—ผโ—ปโ—พโ—ฝ๐Ÿ”ฒ๐Ÿ”ณ๐Ÿ”ˆ๐Ÿ”‰๐Ÿ”Š๐Ÿ”‡๐Ÿ“ฃ๐Ÿ“ข๐Ÿ””๐Ÿ”•๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ€„โ™ โ™ฃโ™ฅโ™ฆ๐ŸŽด๐Ÿ—จ๐Ÿ’ญ๐Ÿ—ฏ๐Ÿ’ฌ๐Ÿ•๐Ÿ•‘๐Ÿ•’๐Ÿ•“๐Ÿ•”๐Ÿ••๐Ÿ•–๐Ÿ•—๐Ÿ•˜๐Ÿ•™๐Ÿ•š๐Ÿ•›๐Ÿ•œ๐Ÿ•๐Ÿ•ž๐Ÿ•Ÿ๐Ÿ• ๐Ÿ•ก๐Ÿ•ข๐Ÿ•ฃ๐Ÿ•ค๐Ÿ•ฅ๐Ÿ•ฆ๐Ÿ•ง
    ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฝ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ถ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ถ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฝ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ถ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ถ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฝ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ถ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฝ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ถ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฝ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฑ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฐ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ด๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ป๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ผ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ญ๐Ÿ‡พ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฟ๐Ÿ‡ผ

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    Doyle

    Edward Francis Doyle February 27, 1822 in Tullow, Carlow, Ireland October 13, 1877 St Louis, Missouri
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    emma doyle

    hi im emma and i was born in illinois, and i'd like to know more about my last name! my grandfathers from wicklow but i dont remember where my grandmother is from.
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    Elisabeth-Caroline Cumin

    Bravo!
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    Nouse4aname

    I was born in Co. Wexford, Ireland. I grew up in a village surrounded by relatives before leaving Ireland to come to the USA. I have since married and settled down in VA. My grandfather was married to a Duggan, I believe they were both born on the Fort, which was washed away in a storm c.1920s.
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    spdoyle

    My family is not from Indiana but Kentucky. My ancestors lived in what is now Mammoth Cave National Park. I dont know why this sight locates my tribe in Indiana. Some of our people have traced our roots back to County Carlow, Ireland.
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    ellenruby

    Tell us about your Doyle clan Edoyle2005
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    Edoyle2005

    Anyone out there?
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    Doyle Family History

    Doyle (or O’Doyle) is one of the most frequently occurring surnames in counties Wexford, Wicklow, Carlow and Dublin and is derived from the Irish Ó Dubhghaill, meaning ‘a descendant of the dark (dubh) stranger (gall)’.

    The name is not included in the great Gaelic genealogies but it appears as Dubhghall in the Annals of the Four Masters where it is often used to distinguish the darker-haired Danish Vikings from the fair haired Norwegian ones (Fionnghall - fair stranger) in the period AD 978 to 1013.

    The Doyles’ main area of settlement was along the Leinster seaboard particularly in counties Wexford and Wicklow. The name was established long before the Anglo-Norman invasion in 1169.

    In Sir William Petty’s ‘Census’ of 1659, the name Doyle or O’Doyle is mentioned as the Principal Irish Name of households in the baronies of the following counties:

    County Carlow

    Carlow Barony: O’Doyle (7); Rathvilly Barony: Doyle (10); Forth Barony: Doyle (16); Idrone Barony and St Mullins: Doyle (40).

     
    County Dublin

    Dublin city: Doyle (20); Newcastle and Uppercross Barony: Doyle (29); Nethercross Barony: Doyle (8); Coolock Barony: Doyle (13).


    County Wexford

    Wexford town and Liberties: Doyle (6); New Ross: Doyle (4) Enniscorthy: Doyle (4); Forth Barony: O’Doyle (16); Bargy Barony: Doyle (8); Shelmalier Barony: Doyle (33); Shelburne Barony: Doyle (19); Bantry Barony: (41); Ballaghkeen barony: Doyle (21); Gorey Barony: Doyle (27); Scarawalsh Barony: Doyle (25).


    County Kildare

    Offaly Barony: O’Doyle (7); Doyle; Naas Barony: Doyle (11); Clane Barony: Doyle (6); Salt Barony: Doyle (18); Kilkea and Moone Barony: Doyle (11); Ikeathy Barony: Doyle (7).


    County Wicklow  

    There are no surviving returns of the 1659 ‘Census’ for County Wicklow.

    In Griffith's 'Primary Valuation' of households taken in the mid-nineteenth century, most Doyle households are in Leinster counties Wexford (1169); Wicklow (556); Dublin (483), Carlow (393), Kilkenny (251) and Kildare (218). However, the name had by now spread into Munster with significant numbers of Doyle households in Cork (111), Kerry (159) and Tipperary (129)

    Although the Doyle surname is now found everywhere in Ireland, it remains most numerous in counties Wexford, Wicklow and Carlow and is ranked as 9th most common name in Ireland.

     

    Some notable Wexford Doyles

    James Warren Doyle (1786-1834), perhaps the most famous Wexford bearer of the name, was born near New Ross in 1786, the posthumous son of a respectable Catholic farmer, James Doyle and his wife, Anne Warren of Loughnageer. In 1805, he entered the Augustinian novitiate and was sent to Coimbra University, Portugal, 1806-08. While there he acted as interpreter for Wellington’s army and then with the British Mission at Lisbon.

    On his return to Ireland, Doyle was ordained to the priesthood on 1 October 1809, at Enniscorthy. He taught logic in New Ross and in 1813 he was appointed to a professorship at Carlow College. He held the Chair of Rhetoric there and from 1814 he was Professor of Theology.

    When Michael Corcoran, Bishop of Kildare and Leighlin, died in February 1819. Doyle was named as his successor. He was just thirty-three years old when he was consecrated bishop in Carlow parish church in November 1819.

    Doyle was an able polemicist and a prolific writer to the press, generally under the initials JKL (James, Kildare and Leighlin). He was the first member of the hierarchy to give public support to Daniel O’Connell in the fight for Catholic Emancipation. Along with O’Connell and others, he was an influential witness before a Select Committee inquiring into conditions in Ireland in 1825.

    He was keenly interested in educational matters and gave his strong support to the National Education system established in 1831. When landlords in his diocese would not make land available for the erection of schoolhouses, he had schools built in graveyards.

    The construction of Carlow Cathedral of the Assumption crowned Doyle's career. He fell ill a few months after it was opened in late 1833 and died 15 June 1834. He was buried in his new cathedral. A sculpture, by John Hogan, in memory of Doyle was completed in 1839.

    Seamus Doyle was one of the leaders of the 1916 Rising in Enniscorthy, County Wexford. According to his own testimony, Father Philip Roche of 1798 fame was his great uncle. He joined the Gaelic League in 1900 and was sworn into the Irish Republican Brotherhood in Gorey in 1907. In 1913 he joined the Irish Volunteers and became secretary of the board that oversaw the Volunteers in County Wexford.

    At the outbreak of the Rising he was Adjutant of the Enniscorthy Battalion. With Sean Etchingham, he travelled to Dublin under military escort to get confirmation from Pádraig Pearse that Dublin had surrendered. He was interned after the Rising and served time in Dartmoor, Lewes, Maidstone and Pentonville prisons in England. He was active in the Irish War of Independence and was elected to Dáil Eireann as an anti-Treaty Sinn Féin member. He also served as chairman of Enniscorthy Rural District Council, and was a member of Wexford County Council.

    Seamus Doyle was an exceptional historian of pre-Norman Ireland and an authority on the placenames of County Wexford. He died in 1971.

    Martin Doyle was born on October 25, 1894 in the village of Gusserane, close to the town of New Ross. He was the son of Larry Doyle, a farmer struggling to make a living off the land, and his wife Bridget. Doyle joined the Royal Irish Regiment in late 1909 and served in India in 1913.

    Doyle served during the First World War and was awarded both the Military Medal and the Victoria Cross for his spectacular courage under fire. In 1919 Doyle went to Buckingham Palace to receive his Victoria Cross from the king, and left the army a short time later.

    In 1920 he joined the IRA and became an intelligence officer for the mid-Clare brigade in Ennis in the War of Independence. During the Civil War he served with the Free State Army in Waterford, Kilkenny and south Tipperary and was wounded in the left arm in Limerick in early 1923. He served in the Irish Army until 1937 and then joined Guinness as a security guard. He died in Dublin in 1940 from poliomyelitis, aged 49, and is buried in Grangegorman Military Cemetery.

    Paddy Doyle, author and disability activist, was born in County Wexford in 1951. He developed a rare neurological condition known as dystonia, which is characterised by sustained muscle contractions. Both parents died before he was four and he was committed to State care and spent eleven years in industrial schools and hospitals.  His memoir, The God Squad, published in 1988, gave a chilling account of the dehumanising and harrowing life he endured in those institutions. The God Squad became an immediate best seller and won the Sunday Tribune Arts Award for Literature, and the Dublin Lord Mayor’s Prize. He became a strong advocate for people with disabilities and for survivors of institutional abuse. Paddy Doyle died in October 2020.

    Elizabeth Doyle, known as Lizzie, was the daughter of Martin Doyle, a farmer, and his wife, Kate Cogley, and lived in Bree, Co. Wexford.  Lizzie had three known siblings: James, Margaret, and Jeremiah. Her mother, Kate died in 1887.

    Elizabeth emigrated to the US around 1909, and settled in Philadelphia but she returned home in June 1911 to be with her dying father who passed away the following month. Early in 1912, Elizabeth decided to return to the US, this time to Chicago. Her cousin, Robert Mernagh – who had also spent time in the US - decided that he would accompany her.

    Elizabeth and Robert boarded the Titanic at Queenstown (Cobh) as third class passengers and both died when Titanic sank on April 15 1912. Their bodies were not recovered.

    Elizabeth’s estate, valued at a meagre £10, was administered to her brother, Jeremiah, a postman, on 10 April 1913. Elizabeth is remembered on the family headstone in St David's church cemetery, Davidstown, Co Wexford.

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